Author Archives: John Robinson

About John Robinson

John is passionate about living intentionally and making a positive impact on our culture. The South Jersey native was raised “Southern style” on sweet tea, southern gospel/bluegrass music and motorsports. After he graduated from Belmont University in Nashville, John began his professional career on Music Row working with some of the most talented artists in country music. John has decades of hands-on experience in event and brand marketing, public relations, social media, sponsorships, and content creation, and his desire to train and encourage others in their efforts led to his work with Purple Monkey Garage, where he is busy “fixing businesses and repairing lives.” John and his wife homeschool their two children.

Top 5 Social Media Tips for Family Businesses

Top 5 Social Media Tips for Family Businesses

Our society has changed dramatically in so many ways. One of the most obvious changes in recent years is the creation and use of social media. Just a few years ago, many words that are now common place either did not exist or had very different meanings. For example, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, posting, twitting, content, engagement, chat, SEO, AdWords, followers, likes, links, etc. These terms and actions have allowed us to connect with individuals, groups, businesses and long-lost friends. We are connected in so many new ways, but has it all really made us more social? That’s an entirely different conversation…

Let’s Not Forget to Teach the Basics

Let’s Not Forget to Teach the Basics

In our current fast paced society, we make what seems to be very significant advances daily. Whether it’s the development of autonomous cars, the advancements in modern medicine or the redirection of buying habits from brick and mortar stores to online. It’s mind blowing what we can do with the talents God has given us.

On the flip side, we also see widespread evidence that the basic skills in life are getting lost within the massive world of advancement. The skills needed to run a household or a small business just don’t seem to be a priority these days.